Shop

InfoInfo

Contact
Press Kit

Below the surface of Shantell Martin’s characteristic black and white compositions is an artists’ inquiry into the role of artist and viewer. In Martin’s world, a work of art is inseparable from its creator and its audience, and art is more than an object of admiration disconnected from the process of its inception. Rather, she sees her work as a vehicle to forge new connections between education, design, philosophy and technology — the glue in an increasingly interdisciplinary world. Her methodical practice of bringing the audience and surroundings into her drawings is a reflection on ever changing time and space. 

Martin’s work with institutions such as the MIT Media Lab, Autodesk and New York University’s Tisch School of the Arts denote her ongoing inquiry into new models and technologies that are transforming the way art is made and consumed. Eschewing traditional art world norms, Martin’s work purposefully bridges fine art, performance art, technology and commercial work. Her artwork has appeared in the Brooklyn Museum, Museum of the Contemporary African Diaspora, Bata Show Museum and at the prestigious Albright Knox Gallery in Buffalo, New York.

Credits

Branding & Design by Anton & Irene with love

Rolf & Daughters
700 Taylor St, Nashville, TN 37208

ROLF & DAUGHTERS

The side of a 100-year old Nashville factory-turned restaurant as a canvas.

Nashville
2014

At Rolf & Daughters, the industrial-chic restaurant with clever New American dishes, communal tables and inventive cocktails, Shantell was commissioned to come and use the Germantown, Nashville locale as a canvas. Adding another touch of fame to its already notable Nashville cuisine, Rolf & Daughters enlisted Martin to paint a mural on its façade.

Martin completed the project as a favor to a friend in May 2014 in her signature technique — black ink on white surfaces. The side of the large 100-year old factory building-turned-restaurant, which has now become its own iconic landmark in the town, is punctuated with phrases like “Grow” and “One Day” spiraling through the pale brown cement wall outside, framing the restaurant.

More Like This:

SS
Saraghina
Next
Share